Shannon Fennell's Blog

My life, cooking, make-up, travel, art and the occasional rant!


2 Comments

I am fund raising to go Volunteer in Africa

Last month there were information sessions held at my college for Volunteer Eco Students Abroad. I only found out about it the day they were happening as there were flyers on the reception desk as I went from classes to work in the admissions office.

VESA logo for t-shirts

I saw the words VOLUNTEER THIS SUMMER! on the flyer so I grabbed one to read at my desk. I have always been an active volunteer and have been looking for more involvement here.

I was very happy to have discovered that flyer as the last session was at 4 p.m. that afternoon which was when I got off work!

The organization was founded in Australia and operates pretty much worldwide. They have projects in South Africa, Laos, Fiji and Ecuador (Amazon). They are geared for students 17-24 years old but anyone can sign-up.

It is a self-paid trip – you pay your own way and spend a week volunteering, and then there is an adventure travel excursion included before you leave. VESA strongly encourages all participants to fund raise to cover their expenses.

I was most interested in the South African project and the Southeast Asia/Laos project as both involved endangered species. The Laos project was at an elephant sanctuary, and in South Africa a portion of the volunteer time is at two conservation parks (one for crocodiles and the other for cheetahs and wild cats.)

image003

The total costs of the program and travel expenses will probably be around $4000 – I don’t have the exact costs for the travel yet as they provide a group rate by the end of the year that you can opt in for, or make your own arrangements. It is close to my tuition costs for one year – but how often will this sort of opportunity come up for me? I decided after my mom died that I was going to do things and have adventures while I still could – and this definitely is an adventure.

I applied for the African project and received an offer within two days. I accepted it!

This is what I will be doing next May: We will be building/renovating buildings or facilities, assisting in the school and daycare/orphanage and then working at the conservation parks. All the participants will get to work in ALL the areas.

image005

This is a link to the Season Reports for Africa – it tells about the work that the volunteers have done.  African Project Season Reports

I started fundraising as of yesterday.

I set-up a personal fundraising page on Facebook. This is my fundraising page Volunteering in Africa – Shannon’s Trip Expenses if you would like to contribute there.

I can also accept direct e-transfers (to save on the processing fees!) if that is convenient for you. All of the funds through both methods will end up in the same account that I set-up specifically for the money raised for the trip.

I am in production mode creating Christmas Cards to sell – hand-drawn and coloured. I will soon have them up online. I am going to be selling them $5 for one; $24 for five, plus postage. Each will be a unique piece of art. If you would like to buy some drop me a message through Facebook or comment on this blog and I’ll respond! These are my first prototypes which will be one-off as I have actually come up with other very unique designs that I am still colouring.  They are on card stock with envelopes. I plan to have my complete supply read to ship within two weeks, in time for use this Christmas.

I got a couple coloured from the second set of designs – here they are. Drawn in Micro pens and coloured with Copic markers.

I am also thinking about selling my world-famous candy (brittles and barks) closer to Christmas – I sold off my excess last Christmas and it was very popular so, depending on my workload I may get that going. If you happen to be interested – I will take and make to order!

I am very excited about this trip – exploring different cultures, seeing a different part of the world, and just the whole experience of working in a group doing something to help others in their own environment will be so satisfying on a personal level.

If you are able to help me out I will be forever grateful! And any funds in excess of the travel and program costs will be used to buy supplies to take to the village I will be working in. VESA will be sending us lists of items that are needed/appropriate gifts that we can take.

Thanks for reading through!

Advertisements


Leave a comment

What I saw on my vacation…

This will be the third and last post about my Transatlantic cruise in May aboard the Disney Magic.

We stopped in five ports – Ponta Delgada in the Azores and Lisbon both of which are in Portugal, and Cádiz, Málaga and Ibiza in Spain. We disembarked in Barcelona and were taken straight to the airport so I am not counting that (other than waiting 5 hours to check-in is stupid!)

There wasn’t a lot of information provided about the tours or ports – just the brief description in the brochure/website with the prices. On other cruises I have been on we always had port talks on board and were provided detailed printed information about the ports – history, maps, shopping information, etc. I was really surprized that there was nothing provided on this cruise.

May 20 – Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal

Tour was “Highlights of Ribeira Grande” and the brochure description was “Scenic travel towards the central part of the island to Serra de Agua de Pau and Barrosa Mountain. After a brief photo stop, travel toward the north coast and visit Caldeira Velha monument. Continue to Ribeira Grande for a brief stop before heading to a local farm known for breeding Lusitano horses. Enjoy wine and cheese tasting at the farmhouse and visit the horse stables.”

I had never been to the Azores before so was very excited. I woke up early and saw the lights of the island on the horizon, and was able to watch the ship maneuvering into port and docking – all from my veranda. Pretty cool!

Weather was overcast with a low ceiling so we couldn’t see the tops of the mountains. Which was a shame.  Also hampered the views from the top of the mountains so we couldn’t see the whole island from the top – that was a bit disappointing.  But still was a great tour.

Ponta Delgada is the largest city on the island and Ribeira Grande is the second largest. It is a very beautiful place. We drove through Ponta Delgada and up the caldera to view the largest undeveloped volcanic lake on the island – it was hit and miss whether we would be able to see it due to the clouds, BUT just as we got to the lookout point the cloud opened up enough for us to see it! There were some excellent views of the island on the drive as the clouds would break every now and then.

DSC06645

We then stopped at the Caldeira Velha Monument – which is a botanical park, not a “monument” as we were thinking it meant. There were hot springs there with public access so lots of people soaking in the pools. It was pretty cool seeing the water boiling up out of the ground, but it did make you think how close we must be to active magma! Lots of very Jurassic Park looking plants.

It is a very pastoral island, lots of agriculture. Their cows are very content – all pastured and clean. They take trucks out to the cows IN THE FIELD to milk them! They supply a huge percentage of dairy products to the mainland, along with tea and other products.

We then arrived in Ribeira Grande which means “Big River”… um, no. It is a creek, barely. But must be the biggest on the island I guess.

DSC06690

A very picturesque town with old Portuguese buildings but lots of modern touches. A Hybrid Lexus cruised by us and the guy next to me commented he must have turned off his engine to coast down the small street – I pointed out it was a hybrid running on battery. We stopped at as shop selling local liquor and souvenirs.

This island is known as “The Island of Hydrangeas” and they are everywhere – so I bought a fridge magnet in the shape of one.

We then went to a horse farm the bred Lusitano horses and saw some absolutely gorgeous horses! Their stable was beautiful too. The owner explained the history of the breed and how her family got into them. The Lusitano breed is from the same Roman era base stock as the Andalusian and Lipizzaner, and you can see it in the conformation. So beautiful. And they were so calm and friendly, for stallions!

Then they took us to another building and we had a wine and cheese tasting – well, slightly more than a taste of cheese for me! I didn’t try any wine of course. The cheese was really good – six varieties all made there. Some was fresh made just for today! They explained all the processes and features of the wine and cheese.

DSC06718

Then we went back to Ponta Delgada. I stopped to buy some local tea – which is excellent by the way! It was Orange Pekoe and very smooth and pleasant. Wish I had bought a bigger box now.

DSC06724

On the tour our guide told us that most of the flora and fauna we see are imports. When the Portuguese first arrived on the island it was mostly low scrub. As the islands are pretty far out in the Atlantic and isolated, the natural migration of things was very sporadic. There are no poisonous insect or animals on the islands, and even mosquitos are very rare.

There used to be orange groves all over but a disease killed off the industry and they diversified into pineapple (they grow it in greenhouses!), dairy, wine and fruit liqueurs, and also wheat and corn, etc. Tourism is just starting to really take off in a big way.

I really enjoyed the day. I’ll add the Azores to the list to possibly visit again sometime.

May 22 – Lisbon, Portugal

I had visited Lisbon before in 1995 when we did our Mediterranean cruise. So I chose a tour outside of Lisbon.

Tour was “Sintra and Casais” and the description was “Travel to Sintra, a 19th century UNESCO World Heritage Site. Have free time for shopping and sightseeing in Sintra’s city centre, and visit the quaint shops and cafes. See the Sintra National Palace (Palácia da Vila), considered the best preserved medieval Royal Palace in Portugal. Drive to Cabo da Roca, the westernmost point of mainland Europe for a photo stop. Return to the pier passing the towns of Guincho, Cascais and Estoril.” I chose the Adults Only Departure.

I woke up really early and was able to see the first sight of land from my veranda. So I got dressed and went up to the lounge to watch us entering port. Lisbon is VERY big and the shop cruised under a large bridge on the way to the docks. Was fun to watch (and not my first bridge!) There were two other ships already docked when we pulled up.

I was a little unimpressed with the “tour” as it consisted of the guide dropping us off at the locations – he talked a little on the ride about where we were going, but did not escort us or show us highlights. In the Azores our guide was with us at all times, giving us information and pointing out interesting things.

Sintra was beautiful though, set on the side of a steep hill, the palace was very impressive.

There was also a fortification on the top of the hill but we weren’t given any information about it from the guide – I probably could google it…

DSC06757

Anyway, it was a very nice place and pleasant to walk around, although VERY congested with tour traffic as there seemed to be a tour bus unloading every 2.3 seconds! There were lots of nice shops – higher class tourist things, locally made crafts, etc. I bought a cork bracelet and a small handmade and painted dish (which has hanging holes so I’ll put it on the wall.)

We then went to Cabo da Roca – the westernmost point of mainland Europe. Great views (if you can get the other million tourists out of your way!) Cliffs and tidal activity was impressive. There was a big monument but trying to get a shot of the text was difficult as people were constantly blocking it to get their own photos. This was just a photo/rest stop. Ended up having to wait for one woman who took 20 minutes more than we were told!

There were lots of flowers – all low shrubby stuff and pretty.

The drive through Cascais was nice – rich resort town, pretty much the same as any other rich resort town on the Mediterranean coast.

We drove through Lisbon a different way than the trip out in the morning and I thought the streetcar was cute. When we got back to the ship we (the Concierge passengers) were invited to party on the Captain’s private deck just below the bridge to have a viewing of our departure from Lisbon’s harbor. There was all sorts of food and drinks, and character visit from Daisy Duck.

May 23 – Cádiz, Spain

Tour was “Seeing Seville” and the description was “Drive to the city of Seville from a guided tour of the 12th century gothic Seville cathedral, the third largest church in Europe, home to the tomb of Christopher Columbus. Wander through a bevy of winding, narrow cobblestone streets and gaze upon a myriad delightful, whitewashed houses during a walking tour of the Barrio se Santa Cruz. Visit the quaint CallejÓn del Agua and spend some time at the Hosteria del Laurel for a beverage and snack. Have free time to explore the city on your own. Take a scenic drive through Seville before returning to Cadiz.”

The tour didn’t leave the ship until 10:45 and it was a very long day! Great, but long. It was a 1.5 hour drive to Seville from Cádiz.

Seville needs so much more time to be explored! The old section is beautiful – Moorish, Spanish, old Jewish quarter – was very much like Morocco. The main square in the old part has the Alcazar on one side, and the Cathedral on the other which is the largest gothic cathedral in Europe.

The Alcazar was definitely Moorish – it was almost the same as the palaces I toured in Morocco last year! The craftsmen who did the tile work quite probably were the same! The Spanish built on top of the original Moorish palace without altering the original. They liked what was there so just added to it.

It was the same with the Cathedral – they like the mosque building so just converted it. The minaret was used as the bell tower.

The tower of the Cathedral has 35 ramps, not stairs, as the call to prayers happens five times a day so the Imam would ride a horse up to make the call! We could go up if we wanted… I didn’t.

Columbus’ tomb is inside the cathedral – it is only a little bit of him actually as he was buried twice before. They did do DNA testing and it IS him though. Quite a cool tomb – different than others I’ve seen in European cathedrals.

DSC06809

Part of the tour was going for Tapas – the guide had read a list of choices to us on the bus. But when we got to the restaurant the waiter said no when some asked for things off that list. We got ONE tapas and ONE drink each. Our table got ignored for quite a while, then my plate (was cheese – four slices of a local Parmesan type cheese…) was forgotten and I had to flag down the waiter to ask where mine was. I also asked for bottled water – but the label had so many ingredients on it in Spanish, that I didn’t bother to even open it.  This restaurant was decorated with bulls… not paintings or ornaments, actual bulls mounted on the walls, many, many bulls who died in bullfights. With plaques with the date and killer noted on it.

DSC06783

After the restaurant our local guide took over and we all were given “whispers” which is the sound system the guides use so you can hear them when they are up the block! She led us around, took us on a tour through the Alcazar and the Cathedral, the Jewish Quarter (the Santa Cruz District) which is against the walls of the Alcazar. After the Cathedral we were on our own.

I went into a couple of shops and bought a painted wood fan and a fridge magnet (my souvenir of choice for this trip). Then I went and sat on the monument steps in the middle of the square to wait to meet with our main guide at 3:45. We then walked to the main street of modern Seville to meet the bus. We drove around a bit to see the gardens and building – which were pavilions from different countries. The Jacaranda trees are stunning! Clouds of deep purple. I tried very hard to get decent photos of them.

I dozed off on the ride back to Cádiz – we got back to the port at 6 p.m. which was the time the ship was supposed to be departing! Then there was a massive crowd in the customs building and then a line for the gangplank. It was a chicken coop style gangplank, and steep. I took a couple of steps, tripped and did a face plant on it… hit hard on my knees, both wrists and my head. Sigh.

Long story short – it was a “possible fracture” in my left wrist and bruising on the rest. Dent in my head lasted three days. Their x-ray machine wasn’t high resolution enough to determine if a mark on the bone was a mark or a fracture. So I got splinted for the rest of the trip. Luckily we travel with a pharmacy so I had anti-inflammatories and pain pills.  The Doctor gave me a waiver to use to cancel the shore excursion I had booked for Málaga as we didn’t know what I would be up to doing tomorrow – that meant I would get a full refund.

1112-17144502-F Lumiere-31039_GPR

May 24 – Málaga, Spain

I went ashore on my own and had a great day. Absolutely beautiful!

When I woke up I was a little stiff but walking was fine (as long as I didn’t actually touch my right knee!) and the wrist wasn’t an issue, it hurt, but the splint protected it. So I took my pills and decided to go ashore and walk around on my own. The shipped was docked RIGHT at the town and the dock was meant for cruise ships so was all laid out for tourists! It all looked gorgeous from my veranda!

DSC06831

There was a bus to take us up to the town from the ship – it wasn’t super far, maybe a kilometer or two total to the town, so if you wanted you could probably walk easily as it was all sidewalks. I wore my skirt to I wouldn’t be putting pressure on my sore knee with pants.

The bus dropped us under some Jacaranda trees! I had a map of the city, so took a few minutes to try to orient myself. I really love these towns! Málaga is old but modern, clean, wide boulevards, narrow streets, and it all mixes up together really beautifully. I got a little off on the map – thought I was one street over but I figured it out. Everything is very close together.

I walked up a very wide pedestrian boulevard with lots of modern boutiques (posh, not tourist!) and wandered around up little side streets. Then I found the cathedral and town hall square, which finally got me in-sync with the map I had! Even the cobblestones were arranged beautifully here.

I then went to the Roman amphitheatre and climbed up to the top seats. It is right there in the town – I love that about exploring Europe, you can see all eras in a couple of blocks!

I decided to go see the Picasso Museum – he was born here. There was the museum and then further out was his house which was also a museum but I wasn’t sure how far that would turn out to be. The museum was only about a block from the Roman amphitheatre. Entrance was only 7€ which was pretty reasonable. There were twelve galleries and work in all mediums that he worked in! Mostly owned/donated by his family. I used one of those audio guides to go through. I’m not really huge into his work as I don’t “get” cubism, but this museum had all his periods represented. And in person, even the cubist stuff is pretty impressive! The colours and texture are really awe-inspiring. There was a shop so I got a couple of postcards of two of the paintings I really liked, and a fridge magnet.

When I left the museum it was getting very hot out so I decided to head back to the ship. I hadn’t brought a hat with me so didn’t want to add heat stroke to my list of current issues. I poked around the duty-free shops at the terminal but didn’t get anything.

I have to say going out on your own is nice as you don’t necessarily run into crowds when departing or boarding. I was quite happy that I had cancelled the tour I had originally booked.

May 25 – Ibiza, Spain

Went ashore on my own – very long shuttle bus ride and the map that was sitting on the dock on a table was only in Spanish.  A lady on the bus asked where I had got it and I told her it was just there and I happened to notice and took one. No one from the cruise or buses bothered to hand them out. Had a walk around the old town which is mostly converted into bars, restaurants and tacky tourist stores. I bought a fridge magnet at a little shop in a hut right by the shuttle bus stop.

Ibiza is a little, um, less impressive than the other ports. First we were docked way out at a multi-purpose pier (commercial area), the shuttle ride was long and confusing so there was no way to figure out if you could find your own way back, the place wasn’t “clean” – lots of litter and just dusty looking. Where we were dropped at was kinda scuzzy – the buildings along the street didn’t look any older than the 1960-70s. I was pointed over to the other side which was the old town. So I walked across the embankment and explored along the waterfront and up a few streets.

I didn’t bother going up to the castle – I was tired and starting to feel the effects of my fall the other day.

Ibiza is a small island and the place is geared for partying tourists – lots of night clubs and night life. Didn’t see any parks or green areas or public squares in the small part I saw in this town. But I didn’t explore too far away from the shuttle stop to be honest.

We were packing and disembarking in the morning so I was back on board around 3 p.m.

So that is what I saw and did off the ship on this Transatlantic Cruise on the Disney Magic. Overall a really nice trip (not including my trip on the gangplank!)

I would definitely like to see more of the Azores, Seville and Málaga – maybe one day I will take a land tour of the area and spend more time exploring.

 


Leave a comment

What I did on my vacation…

On my vacation last month crossing the Atlantic Ocean on the Disney Magic I wasn’t too ambitious, it was a vacation after all!

We spent a total of seven days at sea and the ports we stopped at were Ponta Delgada in the Azores and Lisbon both of which are in Portugal, and Cadiz, Malaga and Ibiza in Spain, we disembarked in Barcelona and were taken straight to the airport.

Other than accumulating as many character photos as I could (I explained that in my previous post here) I took it pretty easy. I saw a bunch of movies – Infinity War, Solo (the premier!) A Wrinkle in Time, Dr. Strange, Black Panther, Thor: Ragnarok, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 and did some crafts and activities.

I went to several of the 3D craft sessions and made things – pre-printed paper and you cut it out and put it together.  One was Pascal from Rapunzel (I painted him with my watercolours) and another was a parrot I wore on Pirate Night (pinned him to my shoulder which worked pretty good – at least it did long enough for photos. He got a little floppy later!) Also built a VERY complicated paper Cinderella but never took a photo of her!

Played 80’s Music Trivia in one of the pubs teamed up with my sister and brother-in-law – we only missed one out of 50 (only thanks to Iain) but there were two teams with perfect scores.

Saw several live musical productions and shows – they were only 45 minutes each but very good. Their cast is very talented – obviously all the musicals were Disney themes!

Did some shopping on board – a couple of shirts and small things. I am not a big shopper on trips – my souvenirs from the ports were fridge magnets, some tea from the Azores (really nice tea) and a couple of postcards.

I did a few paintings and drawings. I had taken my pencils, ink liners, and watercolours. And did manage to do some work.

I went to the “Animation” drawing classes on board – they were fun BUT… the way they had us draw Stitch was wrong. My niece wasn’t impressed. The ears are wrong, the size and shapes are off… I tried to fix it later and coloured it, but it still doesn’t look like Stitch. I did it exactly as shown – so had no other reference at the time.

DSC06851 (2)

I also drew several Disney characters on my own – Ed and Ursula were a couple of those.

As thank you gifts to our Concierge team I drew each of them and then added watercolour – they were all really pleased. I was too – turned out really nice in my own humble opinion!

DSC06733

On Pirate Night they had fireworks at sea. It was a decent night to be out on the deck. I actually managed to get some decent shots, even with my little Sony Cybershot!

One day my brother-in-law booked us on a Galley tour which was interesting. It was actually a lot smaller than I thought it would be! There is one station with a dedicated chef for preparing food for people with allergies. I have to say they were extremely diligent about food allergies – they have your information on file and ALL the waiters would come and ask you questions. When you are seated in the restaurants – even at open seatings – they ask your cabin number and print off the notes they have on your dietary needs.

Deck 3 where two of the restaurants and most of the adult spaces (pub and clubs) had huge portholes – was fun to look out while waiting in lines! This is mid-Atlantic Ocean – just look at that sea! Like a mirror.

DSC06561

I caught this little princess while we were in line for dinner.

DSC06420 (2)

They also produced “deck dance parties” which were short shows on stage on deck with characters and extremely loud music. I only went to two – the first welcome one and the Pirate Night show. They also showed movies on that jumbo screen – mostly classic Disney and the newer Pixar stuff.

It was a very relaxing trip.

I will post about the port visits in my next blog – lots more photos to share!


1 Comment

Had a lovely vacation

Last month I went on a two-week Transatlantic cruise with my sister and her family on the Disney Magic from Miami to Barcelona. It was a great trip – VERY relaxing and smooth.

I have cruised before – six times – on other cruise lines. My favourite cruise line being Royal Caribbean which I’ve been on four times. While I did enjoy the Disney cruise, I will still rate Royal Caribbean as my preferred cruise line (note that it has been quite a few years since I cruised with Royal Caribbean.) As I am, ahem, “mature” I don’t require all the family and children oriented extras. Even though I don’t need them, they are amazing on the Disney line! If you have kids (and can afford it) I would definitely say take a Disney cruise, but for me, as a single adult, other options suit me better.

The trip was a gift so I actually did not pay for the cruise – I just covered my airfare and all my own expenses. If I had been paying for the cruise – I would probably NOT have gone on Disney. It is expensive. And… we were Concierge level which is VERY expensive. When I look at the cost of that vs. the cost of other cruise lines it just doesn’t seem to be justified.  Not to say being Concierge wasn’t awesome and amazing, BUT for me the cost of that extra service level wasn’t necessary to my enjoyment of a cruise.

My cabin was very comfortable and the room host/steward, Jojo, was always around and making sure things were good. Cabin was a huge upgrade from my first cruise cabin in 1988! The bathroom was actually split into two – on room was the shower with a sink, the other a toilet with a full vanity – nice as the shower didn’t steam up the mirror!

Compare the above to this shot from our 1995 Mediterranean cruise!

2017_08_09_15_36_360003

Having the veranda was great.  I was never really impressed with the idea of paying extra for a veranda, however on this trip, I loved it.  Probably would not be such a great extra on a stormy crossing or trip where you were off the ship everyday, but for the long calm days at sea I sat out there often.

And it was great to watch docking and view the ports from too!

It was wonderful having the Concierge staff available (Alina, Blanca and Emanuela were fantastic, as were the rest of the staff) to take care of things like getting tickets, picking up passes, confirming flights, and making sure I had heavy cream available for my coffee in the lounge, etc. I could manage do that myself and save $$$$ on a trip; that would be another whole vacation paid for! And having the private Concierge Lounge was super nice – always had drinks and snacks available, indoor and outdoor deck seating where you could sit and read or in my case, draw and paint.

It was a great trip. Minor hiccups aside.

As this was a Disney cruise they had the characters out and about every day for photos ops and roaming the decks. Not ALL the characters, but the main animated and top princesses. I was EXTREMELY disappointed that there were no superheros… VERY VERY disappointed. However, they were running ALL the latest Marvel and Star Wars movies, along with other Disney owned titles. We even had the premier of Solo, complete with red carpet on board on opening night. Saw Infinity War too.

My nephew and I challenged each other before we boarded in Miami – Who could get the most character photos.  He inferred I would never beat him. Little did he realize just HOW competitive I can be. As we had seven – yes, SEVEN – full days at sea the photo ops were constant. As I had nothing pressing I went from location to location getting photos with all the characters on board… EVERY SINGLE ONE… Multiple times! Mickey and the gang had different outfits for each day or theme, so of course I had to get photos of all. Sometimes I had to ask people in line WHO I was getting the photo with as I wasn’t familiar with the character! I made lots of friends in line – and the lines were never long. There were more adults getting photos than children. I ended up with 207 professional photos taken, along with the ones on my own camera. My nephew… Zilch.

I really have to say that the performers were AMAZING. Truly wonderful at being the characters in all situations. AND had astounding memories too as you could continue conversations started on one day with any princess a couple of days later and they honestly seemed to remember it. I loved Rapunzel and Stitch, in particular. And Chip and Dale were great – on my first photo with them Chip stole my camera and started taking photos/selfies…

Then Stitch did it too…

DSC06605.JPG

I think that may be my favourite photo of the trip! LOL

The food was good. And our waiter Guiseppi was wonderful as he really understood my dietary issues – his wife was also diabetic and followed the same dietary restrictions as I do. So he was anticipating and actually bringing me things that he knew I could eat without being asked. I did, however, get heartily sick of shrimp/prawns and seafood by the last couple of days of the cruise. I found things to be under seasoned in general, AND numerous times I would get excited about an entree option only to find it was prepared in a way I could not eat: cooked in wine (loathe it) or breaded (don’t eat carbs) or rubbed/sauced (don’t eat sugar). The excitement I felt the night we had rack of lamb and it WASN’T breaded was unbelievable!

There were three restaurants for dinner – Lumiere, Rapunzel’s and Animator’s Palate. We rotated to a different one each night with the same serving team going with us. Was okay. They really hype this rotational dining – was always being mentioned by the cruise director.

I do have to say, in all honesty, that I have enjoyed food more on a Royal Caribbean cruise (they did have the Executive Chef of the line on board that trip though… might have made a difference!) How I judge this is that I can still name and remember multiple specific things we ate on that cruise back in 1991! I would be hard pressed to remember anything specific from this latest trip.

Crispy bacon was hard to get – only twice did it actually come in proper crispy form. Sure, I could have sent it back, but I had other things to do.  Also, two mornings my breakfast orders were messed up. Only at dinner, on Disney, do you get the same serving team; breakfast and lunch you get whomever is waiting the section they seat you in.

I always went to the main restaurant to be waited on. Most people ate at the cafeteria style and other places on deck, etc. as they had longer hours and were self-serve. I don’t like that, I want to be waited on and not have to guess what is in the food.

The crossing of the Atlantic was unbelievably calm. Like glass most days. This is rare. We were told by the captain that this has never happened in his career. And experienced “crossing cruisers” also said this has never happened to them either. I was actually looking forward to a little North Atlantic weather (I like it stormy) but, this was really pleasant! The grayest day of the entire trip was Miami when we boarded.  And there were many great sunsets and sunrises!

I took advantage of the professional photographers and had lots of photos taken. What the heck! I was buying the package of “all photos” as narrowing it down to just 10 or 20 was impossible. So I took every opportunity available. Solomon, one the photographers knew my name and cabin number by heart by day two, and even sent me a special thank you card and print of a princess! LOL

That last photo above… well… That was the day after Cadiz. When boarding after the shore excursion I did a face plant on the gangplank… hard hits on knees, both wrists and my head. Had multiple ship security personnel and a ranking officer on me immediately telling me not to move. Long story short… left wrist had a “possible fracture.” I had a dent in my head for a few days and my right knee finally doesn’t hurt to touch anymore.  I went for more x-rays after I got home to confirm whether there was a fracture or not (the ship’s x-ray capability wasn’t high-resolution and they weren’t sure) and it was a bad sprain only thankfully.

Ports of Call were the Azores, Lisbon, Cadiz, Malaga, Ibiza and final stop in Barcelona. Really nice tours – Azores was a bit damp and cloudy but pleasant, weather everywhere else was nice and sunny. I’ll do another post about what I saw and did, including fun  shipboard activities! This one is getting pretty long.

 

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Saying bye-bye to 2017

2017 was a huge year for changes.  It also seems, now, like it was a very VERY long year as well.  So much went on for me that I actually have to look through my Daytimer to remember what happened back in the first six months!

I actually forgot I went to Morocco this Spring until I looked at my calendar!  I know I’m getting on but thought the memory was a bit better than that.

Major activities and events are noted – there was a lot more running around and many bookings but I’m just hitting the bigs things.

January

Had production meetings/tests for Spamalot; took a kiln-fused glass workshop; started a photography course; and auditioned for a play (didn’t get a part.)

February

Spamalot ran – did hair, make-up, props and the Lady of the Lakes costumes; finished the photography course (subsequently I sold my fancy camera – I prefer my little point and shoot); large crew face painting job for Family Day and continuing eye treatments.

dsc03579

March

Took a conflict resolution workshop and a managing change workshop through work; took an acting workshop at the theatre; did make-up for Wait Until Dark; got last vaccinations for trip to Morocco; left for Morocco on the 24th – rode a camel in the Sahara, amongst many other amazing things.

Camel Ride

April

Returned from Morocco on the 4th – was a fantastic trip that I blogged about so you can check out the details if you are interested; continuing eye treatments; multiple large crew face painting jobs; and asked at work to increase my hours from 25/week, was given time to think about it, then pressure later applied by my supervisor.  They asked me to work 35 hours a week without changing my classification to full-time, I countered that I would go to 30 as I wouldn’t do 35 without getting the full-time benefits (full-time work 35 hours!)

May

Had a photo shoot with MAJ Photography; attended NOOBCon as a vendor and demonstrator; attended an advanced Excel workshop through work; took another kiln-fused glass workshop; did the hair and make-up for Robin Hood and the Heroes of Sherwood Forest; started new hours/shift at work; and continuing eye treatments.

Maj Photography (25 of 37)

June

Took another kiln-fused glass workshop; auditioned for a show (didn’t get a part); large crew face painting job; and continuing eye treatments.

July

Large crew face painting jobs; continuing eye treatments; went on a cemetery tour in town; and took another kiln-fused glass workshop (I love it!). I was “terminated without cause” by my employer after being pressured into increasing my hours and after a good quarterly review – had to sign waiver to get the settlement offer of three months wages (lawyer said that was generous so take it.) When I told my sister about the termination she said I should move out to stay with them in Ajax… I thought about it for approximately 10 minutes.  Listed my house for sale.

19961495_684207325104824_8933266187611343389_n

August

Annual job at Grizfest over the long weekend, and also the Debolt Fair and Hythe Fair; continuing eye treatments – had a bad reaction and scare; started an accounting course at the college on the 14th (full-time for seven weeks); and many showings of my house.

September

Booked solid with a client for five days over the long weekend; continued the accounting program at the college and did the practicum; continuing eye treatments; accepted an offer on my house; farewell party for me at the theatre; continued liquidating belongings for the move as I was only taking what fit in my RAV4; and started packing and doing all the things you have to do when moving.  I started changing all my online listings etc. to reflect Ajax, Ontario and had bookings for Halloween right away. Sold my face painting physical assets and referred customers to one of my crew members to take over locally.

October – MOVING!

End of September/beginning of October was crazy busy getting things sorted for the move to Ajax, Ontario and the selling of the house. Car service, car detailing, lawyer’s appointments, making arrangements with various institutions, got a “smart” phone (ha!  hate it), advanced voting for City Council (didn’t want to miss that as a few friends were running!); left Grande Prairie on the morning October 7th to drive to Edmonton to meet my nephew who helped with the driving – we arrived in Ajax around 2 p.m. on October 11th.  Then I had all the running around to do once I got here: apply for my Ontario driver’s license and provincial health card; change my car and home insurance; make-up appointments throughout the month; and was booked to teach make-up/sfx at the Oshawa Public Libraries. Started applying for part-time jobs close to home. I traded in my 2012 RAV4 for a Lexus NX300h (that’s the hybrid.) I was actually intending to trade-in for a new RAV4 Hybrid but when I stopped in at Pickering Toyota the salesman I was passed to treated me as a “brainless woman” and had no interest in selling me one – said they didn’t have any, that if I was wanting one to save money on gas it wasn’t worth it, etc. He didn’t even ask my name to call me when they arrived! So my sister took me right over to “her” salesperson at Lexus that afternoon.  And the rest, as they say, is history.

November

Continued applying for part-time work.  Went to see Bat Out of Hell.  Went to the Royal Winter Fair.  Found a graphics company to design a new wrap for my Lexus. Got new personalized Ontario plates for the new wheels – ART ON U. Decided to go back to school to get a Fine Arts degree (eventually) – checked out the local offerings and went on a tour of Durham College. Applied to Durham College for the Foundations in Art & Design program.

December

On the 1st received an offer of a spot at Durham College for the January intake which I accepted; attended the first year student orientation; ordered a parking pass; got my timetable and student card. Went to see Bat Out of Hell… again! Vehicle wrap done.  Booked to teach next month at the Oshawa Public Libraries.

I still have to get good shots of the new car wrap – it is really cold right now and I can’t wash the wrap yet so the car is a bit dirty.

DSC05698

Also, I now seem to “have” a dog named Brian.

 2016

I am very excited about being a full-time student again… it has been a long time! I’ve got seven class blocks a week this semester. Am really looking forward to learning lots of new and interesting things in the new year.

And looking forward to the Transatlantic cruise I am going on in May!

 

 


Leave a comment

My Moroccan Adventure: Final Post

Morocco was a place I had always wanted to see.  I was looking through my high school yearbook and saw that I had said I would be in Morocco! So I decided I had better get on that so, if there is a 50 year reunion, I could say, “Yes, I went to Morocco.  Why? Didn’t you become Prime Minister?”

kinopoisk.ru

This was my second tour with Insight Vacations and I would go with them again. This tour covered pretty much everything about Morocco and we got to see the highlights, geography and many historic locations.  Our guide was knowledgeable, multilingual and very conscientious.  He also arranged extra things that weren’t part of the planned itinerary – like the camel ride and tour in Essaouira, which I REALLY appreciated as they turned out to be my personal favourites!

This tour was Insight Vacations Best of Morocco and this was the itinerary:

Tour Map Insight

There were a few things that could have used more attention: like assisting us in and out of the bus as that last step was difficult and most of us weren’t, ahem, spring chickens. But most of those things were minor compared to the overall trip.

I am a planner. Ahead of time I thought about what I wanted to buy myself while there and made a list. I wanted to get myself a tunic or kaftan, I wanted a ceramic tile to frame, I wanted a fossil and I wanted an ornament suitable for my Christmas tree.  I got all of those and a few more.  And I kept it all within my spending limit too!

Here are the purchases I planned for:

The blouse I bought at the hotel gift shop in Marrakech – my most expensive purchase at 1200 Dirham (about $250) but it is gorgeous and so finely made!  The tile was purchased at the ceramic cooperative we visited in Fes and I am going to have it framed to hang in my entry.  The little “fossil” dish is probably a fake – but it is still a souvenir from Erfoud! And the red tassel is, I think, a bookmark. I bought it at the airport in Casablanca when I was leaving – I had 57 dirham left that I wasn’t able to exchange (they only had Canadian $20s) it cost 56!  That will be my Christmas ornament.

The other items I bought:

A little stone camel to remember my camel ride!  A wooden bead and needlework bracelet that matches my blouse.  A ceramic bowl that I bought with the tile (it is microwave, dishwasher and oven safe.) And an original watercolour painting of the Dades Valley I found in a gallery in Essaouira.

I also bought this wooden box when we stopped at the Argon oil cooperative – it is very cool!  Spin the top and four compartments swing open.

When mom and I travelled she always would buy a wooden item – we have some sort of wood from most places we visited.  A mahogany trunk, inlaid wood boxes, urns, small carvings, Tiki idols, etc.  So this continues that tradition.

My biggest goal was to get photos of the exotic places and things of Morocco and I managed that to my great satisfaction!  I used my 15-year-old Sony Cybershot.  I carried the camera in my pocket all the time and snapped my shots quickly.  It also took some great photos through the bus windows while we were moving.  I can’t be bothered with “fancy” cameras.  I did have a bit of a scare though – the sand on the Sahara was blowing and got into the shutter mechanism.  I used the blow dryer in the bathroom to blow out any loose sand and played with the shutter a bit as it was sticking.  But it got back to normal after a bit, thank goodness!

Of all the photos I took I think these are my favourites:

My flights were booked at the time I booked the tour.  I requested special meals from the selection offered and not one… NOT ONE… of the six flights had the meals.  They didn’t even have a vegetarian option available.  On the way there I packed myself food (I’m used to not being able to eat the offered meals) but on the way back that wasn’t an easy option.  I did buy cheese and nuts at the airports.

On the way home I had to stay overnight in Amsterdam and was having issues with my ankle and leg, so I checked into upgrading when I got to the gate.  As they were overbooked in Economy it was less than half the usual price!  So I flew home First Class!

Look – a padded seat belt!  Did you know you get an entire overhead luggage compartment to yourself and can bring more luggage?  Still wasn’t able to eat most of the food offered at the meals but managed some fish, and I was able to eat the snacks, and the purser found a veggie tray for me!  And I had my cheese and nuts to supplement.

First class selfie

Somewhere over Canada… and the Calgary descent.

My Moroccan Adventure was a once in a lifetime experience!  I am so glad I had the opportunity to go and to see it.  It is a lovely country and people were very welcoming.

My next trip is booked for 2018! A Transatlantic Cruise.  Then… I think, Ireland the year after.

 


Leave a comment

My Moroccan Adventure: The Overall Review, Part 2

If you have followed my blog or read back, you know I eat Low Carb High Fat to control my Type 2 Diabetes.  So I was spending a lot of time thinking about how I was going to manage eating on this tour.  I love North African and Middle Eastern food so I was planning to at least taste everything, regardless, and just monitor and adjust my medication accordingly.

I was really looking forward to tasting REAL Moroccan food, in Morocco.

Well…

I lost 10 pounds on this tour.  I am seriously considering putting out a diet plan based on it – “The Olive, Cheese and Powdered Egg” diet.

I was so disappointed.

I have a few theories:

  1. Everywhere we ate was cooking bland for the tourists who they think can’t handle spice/flavour
  2. My taste buds are ageing faster than I thought and I need MORE spice
  3. My expectations were too high and it is that bland

But… many of my travel companions also expressed the same disappointment in the food and flavours we were getting.  We all were expecting it to be spicier.

We had to ask for salt and pepper everywhere.  They did not put it on the tables.  And everything NEEDED salt, lots of salt.  I found that a little strange.

Two of the special dinners were in themed Moroccan restaurants and were promoted as “authentic” meals.  They were enjoyable evenings, but the food wasn’t what I was expecting.

Fes Signaure evening

At both of these dinners they started with what our guide called a “cook’s salad” which at one consisted of nine small bowls of different things – olives, pickles, dips of different types, cucumber pieces, etc. that you would eat with the local bread that was on the table. The other restaurant served a similar course but on a huge platter with a slightly different selection of items.  I ate what I could from those selections – mainly olives.

Marrakesh dinner (2)

The main course at both was a Tangine.  I was expecting so much more flavour.   I picked out the meat and olives to try when I could. The meat (I only tried chicken and lamb due to my beef allergy) tended to be tough. The flavours weren’t awful, but there was so little of them.

If you aren’t aware, a tangine is a ceramic cooking dish – a flat dish with a cone-shaped top as seen in the photo below – the dishes prepared in it are called the same.

DSC04215

I loved the olives – which was a very good thing as I pretty much ate them at every meal.

The meal in the Marrakech optional night out was more extensive and also served a couscous dish as the third course which was fairly decent according to the others.

The dessert that night was enjoyed by my table companions – a huge flaky pastry with icing.  In Fes dessert was fresh fruit.

Marrakesh dinner (3)

The hotel breakfast buffets blend together as they essentially were all the same.  There were a couple of variations though.

They all had machines that produced coffee… espresso, a double espresso, a cafe au lait, and cafe american.  You had to get your own.  And if you asked for cream they gave you hot milk.  Apparently there is NO cream in Morocco – I asked everywhere.  None.  I even asked our guide if he could find me some decaf coffee and cream – nope.  I wonder what they do with the cream they produce?  I should research that.

Now, that isn’t to say that the cafe au lait wasn’t good – it was!  I had many of them.  But I really wanted cream!

Breakfast was the meal I considered my most important – it was included each day of the tour so I knew I could eat well to carry me through the day in case I wasn’t able to partake of other offerings.  Due to the selections offered – which were many, no issue at all with the amount of selection offered to everyone  – I was stuck with sliced cheeses (all very bland), assorted olives (served at every meal in Morocco) and eggs.  And a couple of times sliced cucumbers or stewed peppers, and sometimes a plain yoghurt.

Now, those eggs.  That was … interesting.  The one hotel only served them hard-boiled in the shell, hot; the others had scrambled powdered eggs – you can tell because of the texture and the fact that the curds and liquid have separated (shudder); and thankfully three of the hotels had omelette stations where they made omelettes to order out of real eggs and you could ask for them fried too if you wanted.

One hotel served pork. I was very surprised as it is a Muslim country. But they had shaved parma ham on the salad table at dinner and pork sausages and bacon at breakfast.  I did not partake of the bacon – it appeared to have been boiled.

Most of the meats were tough at the hotel meals – mostly chicken and lamb in tangines.  I may also have tried goat but I don’t know for sure.  The dinner buffets were awkward for me as they had a lot of beef (I’m allergic) and there were a lot of sauces that I had to avoid due to potential inclusion of beef stock, etc.  And the mixed salads usually were combinations of fruit and vegetables and I don’t eat fruit, and the dressings were unknown ingredients.

One hotel had fresh calamari and roast lamb at the dinner buffet – I had both.  The calamari was lovely.

The dessert selections were epic – I could only watch as others enjoyed those. Pastries, cakes, fruit, etc.

Our guide was very conscientious about making sure there were options for me.  At the lunches where we stopped while on the road, he would have the restaurants make me a small tangine of vegetables and chicken kababs if the main course was beef.  There was always so much more than I could manage.

We were served mint tea several times – it varied from okay to very nice.

Mint tea and an ashtray.JPG

The best was the tea made from scratch for us by the Imam’s wife when we visited them.

DSC04021

A group of us had lunch at poolside on our own at the hotel in Marrakech, we all had the Caesar Salad which was excellent.  It was nothing like what we call a Caesar Salad here in North America though.  It was butter lettuce, cherry tomatoes, shaved parmesan, fresh anchovies and a very subtle and light dressing that did not coat everything.

The best meal I had in Morocco?  On our free evening in Marrakech my seatmate and I went out and found a Lebanese restaurant – it was fantastic, well seasoned and super good!  The hummus was to die for!  Restaurant Mandaloun was the name of it.

Best meal of the trip?  Holiday Inn Express – Schiphol, on my way home I had an overnight stay in Amsterdam.  Yes, Holiday Inn Express serves dinner – who knew?  I got there after 7 p.m. and there were only two other people in the dining room (aka “great room”).  They had a limited menu written on a table top blackboard.  There was a Dorado (aka Mahi-Mahi) fillet – so I went with that and asked for all vegetables, no starch.  The chef delivered the plate to the table himself – he had grilled up a whole bunch of different fresh vegetables for me.  OMG – the fish was crispy grilled on both sides and well-seasoned, the vegetables were perfect and there was also a small bowl of house made spicy pickles.  And I didn’t have to ask for salt!  I was very happy and told the chef it was the best meal of my trip.

I’ve got one more post after this, just to wrap up the overall review and my trip home!